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Clinton aide says Pence didn't get job done

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Sen. Tim Kaine's aggressive interruptions of Mike Pence Tuesday during their debate at Longwood University surprised some longtime observers of Virginia politics, who gave the IN governor an edge on style points.

"In the absence of any specific question on RFRA from the moderator, one would have expected Kaine to make mention of it among his 70 interjections last night, but I guess he was too busy trying to remember the canned one-line zingers he was coached to deliver to focus on an issue that offered perhaps the greatest contrast between himself and Trump's running mate", Angelo said. Now, Mr. Pence's performance-in which he shrugged off Mr. Kaine's attacks on Mr. Trump-is being held up as a model for Mr. Trump to emulate. "I was going after Donald Trump and Mike Pence was kind of going after Trump with me", Kaine said, then suggesting there must be tension between Trump and Pence over it following the debate.

Since last week's debate, Trump has faced a barrage of questions over a leaked tax return showing he lost more than $900 million in 1995.

Trump insisted the practice run "has nothing to do with Sunday" - even as he tried, mostly without success, to keep his response to two minutes, with Carr manning a timer.

"On anything. And so, again and again and again during the debate, I would say something that Trump said".

CBS News didn't respond to the Washington Blade's request for comment Wednesday on why a question on Pence's anti-LGBT record or the "religious freedom" law weren't among those asked during the vice presidential debate.

"I truly do believe Donald Trump embodies the American spirit - strong, freedom-loving, independent, optimistic, and willing to fight everyday for what he believes in". Trump's advisers say he is in "prolonged, formal preparations" for the Sunday showdown. Over time, Pence's posture could get old, but when you see it for the first time in a debate, it's convincing. "He had different policies, for instance, foreign policy, they were totally different", said Glenn Smith with Progress Texas.

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"We know he's an excellent debater", Denton said of Kaine.

Kaine's strategy, it seemed, was regurgitating Trump's own words.

"Adn Donald Trump, if he wants to continue this momentum, he's got to pick up where Gov. Pence left off".

Other than that, the debate was for the most part uninspiring, with both candidates well-prepared with forgettable attack lines and zingers that had little zing. Yes, Trump said. "I'd much rather have it on policy". Trump's campaign manager Wednesday mocked Bill Clinton for his comment that the Affordable Care Act is "the craziest thing in the world", reports Politico.

Clinton is far more practiced at town halls and prefers smaller events with more direct voter engagement. He said he doesn't think the debate changed the course of the race. If Clinton stumbles, she'll feed into conspiracy theories about her health.

In that survey, independents were backing Trump 42% to Clinton's 35%, with 15% behind Johnson. Going into the first debate, Clinton's advantage among women, according to national polls as parsed by the International Business Times, was as low as 5 percent. Deadspin Senior Editor Ashley Feinberg joins us to explore how the key to winning the VP debate was getting into Trump's head one way or another.

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