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Syria photographer puts down camera, picks up injured boy

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Syria photographer puts down camera, picks up injured boy

Habak doesn't know if the boy survived.

Halling the videographer for his effort, a twitter user said, "Every so often, a photograph cuts through the grim cacophony of the war and pierces viewers' hearts".

Distressing images of a man carrying an injured child away from a burning vehicle and another of him weeping next to a boy's body have emerged from a bombing of a bus convoy that targeted Syrian civilians over the weekend.

As buses passed through rebel territory to a town near Aleppo, the blast struck, briefly knocking him unconscious, he said.

Abd Alkader Habak cries on the ground.

Habak, whose pictures carrying the child and later breaking down have gone viral on social media, described the scene as awful, "especially seeing children wailing and dying in front of you".

"So I decided along with my colleagues that we'd put our cameras aside and start rescuing injured people", he added.

The first child he checked on was dead. Someone shouted at him to stay away - the child was already dead, they said.

Habak said he picked up the child who appeared to still be breathing and ran to seek shelter.

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He rushed towards him to pick him up.

Heartbreaking pictures have emerged of a Syrian photographer putting down his camera in order to carry a wounded young boy to safety after a bomb attack and then breaking down in tears after seeing another child lying face down on the ground - presumably dead.

"This child was firmly holding my hand and looking at me", Mr Habak, 24, told CNN.

"I wanted to film everything to make sure there was accountability", said Alrageb. "I feel proud that there was a young journalist there helping to save lives".

He bravely ran back to the scene to see if he could save anyone else.

As the bloody Syrian Civil War wages on for its seventh year, a Syrian photographer could not stand by idly as children were massacred and therefore, he chose to do something.

Of the 126 who died, 68 were children.

"I was overcome with emotion", he told CNN, trying to explain the scene.

One of his colleagues witnessed the entire scene and captured the unique moments.

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