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Hack-weary Equifax yanks a web page that was reportedly delivering malware

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Independent security analyst Randy Abrams claims that the company's website was compromised for several hours on October 11 and was redirecting customers to a fake Adobe Flash update download.

The breach was first noticed by Randy Abrams, an independent security analyst that had been visiting the site to flag fraudulent activity on his credit report.

The firm said it took down the link for credit report assistance temporarily "out of an abundance of caution".

"We are aware of the situation identified on the equifax.com website in the credit report assistance link", an Equifax spokesman told The Hill on Thursday.

The incident comes just over a month after Equifax disclosed a massive data breach in which hackers stole the personal information of more than 145 million US consumers.

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Somehow, the worst credit-card-data breach in US history just got worse.

Equifax, Inc.is looking into another possible breach, just one month after the company disclosed a hack that compromised the sensitive information of 145.5 million people, Ars Technica reports.

The Atlanta-based company, which has faced seething criticism from consumers, regulators and lawmakers over its handling of the earlier breach, said it would provide more information as it becomes available.

Anyone impacted by the breach is now at risk of identity theft and fraud - as any piece of this personal information can be used by, or sold to, criminals who can use it to open credit cards, take out loans, make purchases in your name - or even drain your bank accounts. The hack has led to multiple federal and state investigations and the departure of the company's 12-year chief executive.

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