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Volkswagen manager gets seven-year prison sentence in emissions case

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A former Volkswagen AG executive received the maximum sentence on Wednesday of seven years in prison and a $400,000 fine for his role in the company's emissions scandal.

In August, Oliver Schmidt pled guilty to federal charges of conspiring to defraud the USA and violating the Clean Air Act in connection with Volkswagen's "clean diesel" emissions cheating scandal.

Prosecutors say Schmidt, a German national, lied to USA environmental authorities, lied to investigators and encouraged others at VW to destroy arguments.

To view the full article, register now. He said he considered Schmidt a "key conspirator", who viewed the cover up as an opportunity to "shine" and "climb the corporate ladder".

Schmidt ran VW's USA engineering and environmental office from 2012 through early 2015 and was responsible for obtaining regulatory approval for VW vehicles sold in the U.S.

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Schmidt agreed to be deported to Germany after serving his sentence.

A Volkswagen senior manager has been sentenced to seven years in a USA prison for concealing software that was used to evade pollution limits on almost 600,000 diesel vehicles.

VW auto engineer James Liang was sentenced in August to 40 months in prison and fined $200,000 for his role in the scandal - four months more than prosecutors recommended. They include executives who led engine development as well as the failed efforts to design a diesel engine that would meet the tougher emissions standards the United States adopted for 2007, as well as another liaison to U.S. regulators. The government says he later misled USA investigators and destroyed documents. He argued that he was following a script written by the company's management and one of its lawyers when he lied to the California Air Resources Board about the compliance of VW's cars with U.S. regulations, and that he had come on board after the scheme was devised. Schmidt said he first learned about the company's scheme in the summer of 2015, at the tail-end of the conspiracy.

Mr Schmidt, a German national, is one of eight current and former VW officials charged in the U.S. in the diesel emissions scandal.

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