Spotify will now let users edit song information

Entertainment Spotify South Africa launches only R60 per month for Premium
By Edward Swardt- 12 March 2018 0

The company has announced a new feature, Line-In, where customers can add to the streaming service's metadata, correcting or adding to songs' current genres.

There's no doubt that when it comes to streaming services, Spotify's leading the pack. Spotify offers a free tier of service that is supported by ads. The new feature allows fans to suggest different information pertaining to the song including an artists alias, explicitness and more. Clicking a ✓ indicates your confirmation of that data, and clicking the ✕ tells us that data is incorrect. The premium account will cost users R59.99 per month, the same price as competitors Apple Music, Deezer, and Google Paly Music.

Once users have accessed the Line-In web interface, they can make suggestions about the song's genre, mood, and other attributes. "We've also seen that listeners are eager to describe the music they're passionate about in ways beyond traditional concepts like genre and mood". Based on the pricing of company stock traded on private markets, the company, launched in 2008 and headquartered in Stockholm, Sweden, is valued at $23.4 billion.

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ITWeb is attending the official launch on Tuesday and will provide more details as they become available.

And this month, it revealed in its F-1 filing with the SEC that it had amassed a total of 200 petabytes (about 200,000 terabytes) of data about music and the way its users access it.