learningandfinance.com


Business

Senate votes to protect net neutrality

Share
NYT License N  A Created 2018:02:27 11:20:49

The Trump campaign had net neutrality on its platform through the election process and made repealing it one of the only campaign promises they have kept. Mr. Schumer said that the democratic situation is extremely straightforward; the internet should be treated like the public good that it is. Chuck Schumer of New York, accompanied by House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif., left, Sen.

"This is our chance, our best chance, to make sure the Internet stays accessible and affordable for all Americans", he said as the debate began. "We shouldn't do that with the internet either". John Boozman, R-Ark., said in a written statement.

Republicans insist they, too, believe in net neutrality, but want to safeguard it by crafting forward-looking legislation rather than reimposing an outdated regulatory structure. Another risk of throwing out net neutrality protections is that consumers could face the Death of Nickels and Dimes as charge add-ons to stream video, game or access social media, experts warn.

The measure, approved by a 52-47 vote, would void a decision made in December by the Republican majority of the Federal Communications Commission to repeal the regulations established in 2015 by the agency when Democrats controlled it during President Barack Obama's administration. The real consequences of the decision yesterday will not go into effect until June 11. And express your feelings to them about your voting.

Collins announced her support in January, but Kennedy and Murkowski had been undecided.

There has been a ton of public support for Net Neutrality over the previous year, making it a hard issue for politicians to ignore. The CTIA, USTelecom and the NCTA earlier sent a joint letter to senators asking them to vote against the measure. The measure can not be filibustered in the Senate. Now the resolution goes to the House of Representatives and potentially President Donald Trump.

YouTube Adds Artist, Songwriter Credits To 500M Videos
The new feature will also include a link to official artist channels where available, and official music videos. YouTube has announced " Music in this video ", a new menu that shows song credits on videos with music.

Surgeon General to the Rescue During Delta Flight
The vice admiral, an anesthesiologist, was traveling to MS for a panel discussion on opioid abuse, ABC News reported. The condition of the passenger was not immediately clear, though Adams tweeted "patient doing well".

Starbucks is including practically 3000 shops in China
Now, the firm says that it aims to nearly double the number of coffee shops it has in the world's second-largest economy. It plans to triple its income and double its working revenue in China between 2017 and 2022.

The Net neutrality rules prohibit Internet service providers from selling faster delivery of certain data, slowing speeds for specific content and blocking or otherwise discriminating against any legal material. Tech giants such as Google and Facebook have been vocal in their support for the retention of the rules. Telecommunications companies oppose the regulations.

Net Neutrality protesters in Philadelphia. Democrats think the fight to restore the rules could be a political victor during November's congressional midterm elections even if the effort is unsuccessful, as it will force Republicans to record a vote against reinstating the rules. The threshold Democrats must reach to force a bill on the House floor is much higher than in the Senate.

"We will take a stand to protect our online economy or say goodbye to internet as we know it", said Senator Ed Markey.

"Today is a monumental day", said Democratic senator Edward Markey during a debate. Some of those internet service providers, including Comcast, Time-Warner and Verizon, are among the largest and wealthiest companies in America.

Net neutrality, under which the internet has operated since its inception, ensures that there is no favoritism in internet access.

Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., said the internet thrived long before the Obama administration stepped in with rules in 2015, and he predicted that when the FCC repeal is in place, consumers won't notice a change in their service.

Share